Companion Planting with Companion Planting Chart

Companion Planting

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What Is Companion Planting?

Planting companions is about growing different plants together. It is mainly used as part of home gardens, but ornamental plants like roses also benefit the neighbors they love.

Unlike other areas of the garden, planting companions are not always based on concrete scientific facts, but on observations such as those found in farmers' almanacs.

There is always a strong element of trial and error to see what works for you. However, if you understand your garden as a biodiversity system where all plants are interconnected and interdependent, you can make better planting decisions.

Benefits of Companion Planting

Planting partners have many advantages. Plants can attract beneficial insects and pollinators, deter pests, and therefore act as insect repellants. It can keep unwanted predators and wildlife away. Raccoons, for example, don't like the smell of cucumbers.

Plants also play a role in soil fertility and improve the supply, availability, and absorption of nutrients from the soil. Tall plants like corn provide shade for plants like lettuce that don't grow well in the summer sun and can support plants that need a trellis. Nesting different crops can help to mark the rows, especially when you combine fast germination like radishes with slower crops like lettuce. Planting partners will help weed out.

Companion Planting

Companion Planting Mistakes to Avoid

Just as there are factories that are good neighbors, there are also prohibitions. In general, plants that compete for similar needs for nutrients, water, space (above and below ground with their root systems), and sunlight should not be planted side by side.

Plants prone to the same disease as rust plants should be kept as far away as possible to prevent spread. The same goes for parasites.

Some plants inhibit the growth of other plants. Fennel is probably the best known of the poor companion plants that should have their place in the garden, away from all other crops.

Companion Planting Chart

Before you even think of planting partners in your garden, follow the crop rotation rules. Do not plant the same garden crop in the same location for years of back gardening, as this can lead to pest and disease problems, as well as nutritional imbalances.

According to the source consulted, the information on which plants are good companions can vary greatly. There are few "hard facts" that are unanimously and widely recognized, such as the intolerance of members of the Allium family (onions, garlic, leeks, shallots, chives, chives) to vegetables (beans and peas) due to members of the Allium. family The family Onions release a substance into the soil that kills the beneficial bacteria in the roots of the beans. This inhibits their growth and prevents the beans from fixing nitrogen in the soil.

Here's a list of popular garden crops, with recommended companion plants and unwanted neighbors:

Garden cropCompanion plantsPlants to avoid
BeansBroccoli
Cabbage
Carrots
Cauliflower
Corn
Cucumbers
Eggplant
Garden peas
Potatoes
Radishes
Squash
Strawberries
Tomatoes
Beets
Members of the onion family (onions, garlic, leeks, shallots, scallions, chives)
Peppers
CarrotsBeans
Garden peas
Lettuce
Onions
Tomatoes
Dill
Parsnips
Parsley
Cabbage and other cole crops (broccoli, Brussels sprouts, collard greens, kale, kohlrabi, rutabagas, turnips)Other cole crops
Onions
Potatoes
Pole beans
Strawberries
Tomatoes
CornBeans
Cucumbers
Garden peas
Melons
Potatoes
Squash
Tomatoes
CucumbersBeans
Beets
Corn
Onions
Garden peas
Radishes
Melons
Potatoes
Garden peasBeans
Carrots
Corn
Cucumbers
Eggplant
Peppers
Radishes
Spinach
Tomatoes
Members of the onion family
Potatoes
GarlicBeets
Carrots
Cole crops
Eggplant
Peppers
Potatoes
Tomatoes
Beans
Garden peas
LettuceCorn
Pumpkins
Radishes
Squash
Cole crops
Melon and watermelonBroccoli
Corn
Garlic
Radishes
Potatoes
OnionsBeets
Carrots
Cole crops
Lettuce
Beans
Peas
PeppersBasil
Onions
Beans
PotatoesBeans
Cole crops
Corn
Lettuce
Spinach
Radishes
Eggplant
Peppers
Tomatoes
Summer squash/zucchiniBeans
Corn
Garden peas
Radishes
Potatoes
TomatoesBasil and other herbs
Carrots
Cucumbers
Squash as part of a three-way companion partnership
Cole crops
Corn
Potatoes

Companion Planting

Companion Planting with Herbs

Not all gardens are large enough to grow a variety of plants and plant them together. But that doesn't mean you can't take advantage of the many benefits herbs have to offer: trapping and repelling pests, attracting pollinators and other beneficial insects, and therefore increasing the biodiversity in your garden.

From aphids to tomato worms, these are just a few of the culinary herbs that can fight various pests in your garden or attract beneficial insects:

  • Basil
  • Borage
  • Chives
  • Cilantro
  • Lavender
  • Mint
  • Oregano
  • Rosemary
  • Sage
  • Thyme

Try to grow at least part of the herbaceous plant until it blooms without cutting it, as it will become a real magnet for beneficial insects.

Flowers as Companion Plants

Planting flowers in your garden creates more than just beauty and provides cut flowers. Annual plants like cappuccinos, sunflowers, marigolds, and zinnias, and perennials like lavender repel pests and attract beneficial insects.

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Companion Planting

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