June Gardening To-Do List

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June Gardening 

June is the culmination of spring in the north, a friendly month for plants and people alike. It's a different matter in the south, where summer takes over and brings oppressive conditions for both plants and people. We cannot rule out a heatwave in June, not even in the north.

Southern gardeners should be especially vigilant at this point when it comes to insect pests, plant diseases, and droughts. Northern gardeners need to be aware of these issues too, but not to the same degree.

All Regions

    • Remove the suction cups from the tomato plants.
    • Plums that bloom on old wood after flowering is complete
    • Be alert to insect pests and diseases. These include, but are not limited to, aphids, asparagus beetles, cabbage worms, cutworms, tomato worms, scales, snails, slugs, leaf spots, mold, and rust.
    • Use mature compost or stale manure to cover the plants.
    • I love wisteria after they finish blooming.
    • Place hedges or nets over bushes with ripe berries to prevent birds from eating them.
    • Inspect plants for damage from four-lined insects (Poecilocapsus lineatus).
    • Inspect trees for caterpillar nests.
    • Inspect plants for Japanese beetles (Popillia japonica), including roses, squash, squash, and zucchini.

    Mid-Atlantic

    Expect lows in the mid-80s and lows in the mid-50s to mid-60s. It will likely rain 10-11 days this month. Take advantage of each drier and cooler day to get ahead of your gardening tasks.

    • Be on the lookout for pests like groundhogs and rabbits so they don't get to your crop before you do.
    • Plant pumpkins, cucumbers, squash, and squash outside.
    • Plant members of the beautiful family, if you haven't already.
    • Divide the spring flower bulbs while you still know where they are. Instead, mark the location of anyone you share in the fall before their foliage dies again.
    • Plug gaps left behind as spring bulb plants and early-blooming perennials, such as Pasque flower, disappear with annuals.

    Midwest

    There's a good chance it will rain every three days in June in the Midwest. This will almost certainly keep your plants happy, but not so much that it prevents you from doing your gardening chores. Make sure to work on good days unless you don't mind getting wet while working.

    • Monitor for potential damage from the June bug (Phyllophaga longispina).
    • To avoid wasting energy on seed production, remove spring bulbs after they finish blooming. Also, fertilize them. But wait until the leaves are yellow before cutting them.
    • Plant members of the nightshade family outside if you have not already.
    • Plant cucumbers, beans, zucchini, and squash outdoors.

    Northeast

    Most days it is still pleasant to work in the garden in June. But sudden heat waves are possible; save trips to the beach for those days and do necessary yard work on cooler days.

    • Monitor for potential damage from the June bug (Phyllophaga longispina).
    • To avoid wasting energy on seed production, remove spring bulbs after they finish blooming. Also, fertilize them. But wait until the leaves have turned yellow before cutting them.
    • Plant beans, squash, melons, squash, and cucumbers and make boxes for the vines to grow.
    • Plant members of the nightshade family outside if you have not already.
    • Sow direct seeds for annuals outside.

    Pacific Northwest

    In June, it rains relatively little in the Pacific Northwest. The medium high is 71 F and the average low 53 F.

    • Fertilize your yearbooks.
    • Inspect lily plants for the gall gnat (Contarinia quinquenotata). Their larvae feed on the cocoons of lilies, distorting their appearance. Remove the hairy buds, place them in a bag, and dispose of them properly (not in the compost pile).
    • Plant beans, squash, melons, squash, and cucumbers and make boxes for the vines to grow.
    • Plant members of the nightshade family.
    • Break off any pieces of light bulbs that you feel are starting to fade. Death first, but leave the foliage alone until it turns yellow.
    • Choose ripe strawberries.
    • Plant summer flower bulbs like dahlias.

    Pacific Coast

    June is sunny and dry in Northern California. The average high temperature in San Francisco, for example, is 66 degrees F, the average low 53. Southern California is predictably warmer, with an average high of 78 degrees F and an average low of 60 degrees F.

    In Northern California

      • Strain the tomatoes, apply mulch to help keep the soil evenly moist, and fertilize with a low-nitrogen fertilizer.
      • Be on the lookout for diseases (especially fungal diseases) and insect pests on your rose bushes. Keep them fed and keep the soil evenly moist (dead mulch helps).
      • Make sure your automatic watering system is working properly.

      In Southern California

        • Continue sowing warm season vegetable seeds directly (beans, cantaloupe, squash, etc.).
        • Make sure your automatic irrigation system is working properly.
        • Fertilize your roses.
        • Fertilize citrus and avocado trees.

        Southwest

        In the high desert, daytime temperatures are quite high, but nights can be relatively cool. In Santa Fe, New Mexico, for example, expect an average high temperature of 84 degrees F and an average low temperature of 49 degrees F; you will have about six days of rain.

        It's a different story in Phoenix, Arizona, where it will have an average high temperature of 104 degrees F, an average low temperature of 77 degrees F, and almost no rain.

        • Make sure your automatic watering system is working properly.
        • Mulch whenever possible to conserve moisture.
        • Harvest your date palms (Phoenix dactylifera).

        Southeast

        It starts to get quite hot in June in the southeast. Georgia, for example, has an average high temperature of 86 degrees F and an average low temperature of 68; this state will have 10 rainy days in June.

        • Beware of fungal diseases and pests.
        • Apply tomatoes if you haven't already.
        • Make sure your automatic watering system is working properly.
        • Fertilize and destroy your roses.
        • Some perennials that bloom late in the growing season, such as Joe-Pye grass, can grow so large that they drop. Put them on stakes or cut them in half to keep them tidier.

        Enjoy This Video Tutorial About Surprising Crops You Can Grow In June

        Source: MIgardener

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